Illinois WWII veteran survived POW camps and forced march
History

Illinois WWII veteran survived POW camps and forced march

COLLINSVILLE, Ill. (AP) — This was no “milk run” trip on the B-24 Liberator bomber.


The 10-man U.S. Army air crew, which included Bob Teichgraeber of Collinsville, was on a mission with dozens of other American planes on Feb. 24, 1944, to bomb a factory where Messerschmitt 110 fighter planes were produced in Gotha, Germany.


They faced heavy flak from the ground. In the air, they faced German fighters trying to repel the bombing raid.


Teichgraeber, who served as a gunner on the plane, said they were able to drop their bombs in the daylight attack but about 10 minutes later, a German fighter shot the oxygen tanks on the B-24 and a fire broke out.


Teichgraeber and five others successfully parachuted from their burning bomber, but that was his last day of freedom for more than a year.

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History

Revolutionary War monument back on pedestal in Springville

SPRINGVILLE, Iowa (AP) — A deteriorating Revolutionary War monument, which was damaged even more in the Aug. 10 derecho, has been restored and once again sits on its pedestal in the Springville Cemetery.


For six years, local chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution have been working to raise $44,000 to repair the 16.5-foot marble-and-granite monument. It stands in honor of Nathan Brown, one of two Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Linn County.


A dedication ceremony was held on Veterans Day at the Springville Cemetery, 748 First Ave. in Springville.


The Cedar Rapids Gazette reports the monument was first damaged by a tornado in 1977.


The Marion-Linn, Ashley and Mayflower chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution and Springville Historical Society have worked for six years to raise money, secure grants and find someone to do the delicate restoration work on the monument.

History

Today in History

Today is Friday, Nov. 20, the 325th day of 2020. There are 41 days left in the year.


Today’s Highlight in History:


On Nov. 20, 2000, lawyers for Al Gore and George W. Bush battled before the Florida Supreme Court over whether the presidential election recount should be allowed to continue.


On this date:


In 1620, Peregrine White was born aboard the Mayflower in Massachusetts Bay; he was the first child born of English parents in present-day New England.


In 1945, 22 former Nazi officials went on trial before an international war crimes tribunal in Nuremberg, Germany. (Almost a year later, the International Military Tribune sentenced 12 of the defendants to death; seven received prison sentences ranging from 10 years to life; three were acquitted.)


In 1947, Britain’s future queen, Princess Elizabeth, married Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey.

History

Today in History

Today in History


Today is Tuesday, Nov. 17, the 322nd day of 2020. There are 44 days left in the year.


Today’s Highlight in History:


On Nov. 17, 1800, Congress held its first session in the partially completed U.S. Capitol building.


On this date:


In 1558, Elizabeth I acceded to the English throne upon the death of her half-sister, Queen Mary, beginning a 44-year reign.


In 1869, the Suez Canal opened in Egypt.


In 1889, the Union Pacific Railroad Co. began direct, daily railroad service between Chicago and Portland, Oregon, as well as Chicago and San Francisco.


In 1911, the historically African-American fraternity Omega Psi Phi was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C.


In 1917, French sculptor Auguste Rodin (roh-DAN’) died in Meudon (meh-DON') at age 77.

History

Navy plans 1st Pearl Harbor sub repair facility since WWII

The U.S. Navy is planning the first new submarine repair facility at the Pearl Harbor shipyard in Hawaii since World War II

History

World War II, Korean War veteran made his living in Cobb

MARIETTA, Ga. (AP) — Richard Stroud spent six decades as an engineer at Lockheed Martin. Before his lengthy career designing planes, he flew them for the Navy.


Stroud, 94, spent 62 years with the aerospace and defense company, a flagship Marietta employer. Prior to that long career as an engineer, he served in the Navy for seven years of active duty and another 10 years in the Reserve.


MILITARY CAREER


In his armed forces career, the Bonham, Texas, native participated in both World War II and the Korean War, a pair of conflicts separated by only five years. When Stroud graduated from his Texas high school in 1944, he volunteered for the Navy and trained as a machine gunner.


He entered World War II during its waning moments. Just as he was on his way to combat in 1945, the war came to a close.

S. Carolina man who found WWII medals tracks their home
History

S. Carolina man who found WWII medals tracks their home

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (AP) — Nearly 2 million Purple Hearts have been awarded to brave Americans who have been wounded or killed in the line of duty, and it is one of the highest honors that can be bestowed to veterans.


So last year when a dusty cardboard box was dropped off outside the American Legion Post 166 in Goose Creek with four unclaimed World War II campaign medals and a Purple Heart, Michael Thomas was shocked.


Military citations are rarely lost. They’re handed down for generations. Many veterans are buried with them. Some even end up in local museums. Thomas, a longtime member of the American Legion, knew something had to be done.


“They had gone astray,” Thomas said. “We don’t see medals get lost like this. It’s uncommon and it captured our attention. You just don’t find something like this.”


Don Pace, Post 166 commander, asked for the legion’s membership to create a committee dedicated to the medals’ return.

Islamic State group claims attack at Saudi WWI ceremony
History

Islamic State group claims attack at Saudi WWI ceremony

The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for the explosion at a cemetery in Saudi Arabia the previous day where American and European officials were commemorating the end of World War I

History

For WWII veteran, medals mark a measure of survival

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Fred Becchetti doesn’t hesitate when asked what he was doing when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.


He was washing dishes for 10 cents an hour at the old Alvarado Hotel in Albuquerque.


At the time, the Albuquerque High School junior had more important things on his mind, such as earning his letter in track and field. He remembers dancing that night with friends until 2 a.m. at an old Central Avenue church before retiring for some red-hot chile and juke box tunes at the Red Ball Café.


“Pearl Harbor, the Japanese, and the war had nothing much to do with me at 17,” Becchetti, now 96, told the Albuquerque Journal last month from his home in Virginia Beach, Virginia.


That would change soon enough.


Shortly after his 20th birthday, he would find himself crammed inside the nose turret of a B-24 Liberator, coming under anti-aircraft fire, unloading six 1,000-pound bombs in the north of France.

History

Today in History

Today in History


Today is Thursday, Nov. 12, the 317th day of 2020. There are 49 days left in the year.


Today’s Highlight in History:


On Nov. 12, 1948, former Japanese premier Hideki Tojo and several other World War II Japanese leaders were sentenced to death by a war crimes tribunal.


On this date:


In 1927, Josef Stalin became the undisputed ruler of the Soviet Union as Leon Trotsky was expelled from the Communist Party.


In 1929, Grace Kelly -- the future movie star and Princess of Monaco -- was born in Philadelphia.


In 1942, the World War II naval Battle of Guadalcanal began. (The Allies ended up winning a major victory over Japanese forces.)


In 1975, Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas retired because of failing health, ending a record 36-year term.


In 1977, the city of New Orleans elected its first Black mayor, Ernest “Dutch” Morial (MAW’-ree-al), the winner of a runoff.